Lessons from the Seahawks “Win” over the Buccaneers

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Joe Nicholson-USA TODAY Sports

I’ll say it up front. I’m not sure whether to cheer because the Seattle Seahawks won, or cry because we almost lost to the second worst team in the league. Even though we escaped with a win in overtime, and let’s be honest, we barely escaped, there are several lessons to be learned from Sunday’s game.

The Beast is still alive! Marshawn Lynch had his second 100 yard rushing game of the season with 125 yards on 21 carries. When the Seahawks returned to the rushing game and let Lynch loose, the offense picked up momentum. The coaching staff needs to get back to what has made the Seahawks successful – power running.

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Topics: Seahawks, Seattle Seahawks, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

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  • skeletony

    As far as penalties go this game was not an indicator because at minimum there were two horrendous calls that lead to points against us (to be fair though the refs may have messed up one in our favor on the Ricardo Lockette ‘catch’).

    • David Mortimore

      Yes, there were two horrendous calls, as you describe them. Nevertheless, the Hawks were flagged and the referees have been quick to call pass interference against the Hawks the past few games. We should know that we won’t get away with much. Add to that the fact that the Hawks are the second most penalized team in the league right now with 71 penalties for a total of 649 yards, and penalties are definitely hurting us. That comes to 7.9 penalties/game for an average of 72 yards/game. With offensive production down, we simply cannot sustain that many calls and that many lost yards each game, and still home to bring home the Lombardi trophy.

      • skeletony

        True, but my only point was that this particular game, if it indicated anything as far as penalties go, it only indicated we were about average, unless one presumes that all refs will make such bad calls against us for every game left in the season and if that does happen it is still not something the Hawks can be faulted for. Bad calls will happen to a team who is playing perfectly within the rules just as easily as they happen to a team who has had trouble committing too many penalties.

        • David Mortimore

          You are absolutely correct. In fact, it was slightly less than our average over the entire season. I do think that there will be at least one or two bad calls per game; it would be hard for the referees not to make them. I get more concerned when they are game changing bad calls – like the one against Earl Thomas for defensive pass interference. Although his left arm was in front of the receiver, there was no appreciable interference (e.g., the receiver didn’t fall, slow down, etc.). What are your thoughts?

        • David Mortimore

          You are absolutely correct. In fact, it was slightly less than our average over the entire season. I do think that there will be at least one or two bad calls per game; it would be hard for the referees not to make them. I get more concerned when they are game changing bad calls – like the one against Earl Thomas for defensive pass interference. Although his left arm was in front of the receiver, there was no appreciable interference (e.g., the receiver didn’t fall, slow down, etc.). What are your thoughts?

          • skeletony

            Too true. I will admit to some semi-groundless optimism in that, even against the Seahawks (a team well known to be regularly on the wrong end of bad calls) I do not expect most games to feature such egregious, multiple game-changing bad calls against us. But I am actually much more worried about the things they CAN control such as O-line play, Defense against the run, turnovers etc., than I am about the officiating. Of course this will all change if we lose to the Saints or 49ers because of a ‘phantom holding call’ or some such.

          • David Mortimore

            LOL…I am in full agreement with you. To twist a saying, “Refs will be Refs.” That said, there are several things that the Hawks can work on and control. Just as you said, offensive line play, defending against the run, turnovers…
            I would add that they need to get back to tackling well. They are prioritizing stripping the ball over stopping the runner. Because of that they are giving up too many yards after contact, and opposing teams are breaking too many tackles.
            I’m also bothered by the play calling. If we accept that offensive line is weak and can delay defensive players vice stop them, it would seem that Wilson would be rolling out more vice trying to stay in a pocket. We need to use his mobility to overcome the line’s poor blocking.

          • skeletony

            Agreed. I would add that, in addition to focusing too much on stripping the ball (instead of tackling) I think the speed of our young defense is working against us. I cannot even count how many times I saw Thomas, Chancellor or Wright (etc.) run right by an opposing ball carrier who had ‘stutter-stepped’ or changed direction a bit.
            I was chocking this up to them lacking patience and veteran wile. The way they play is often like a NASCAR driver in a residential neighborhood; can’t see the proverbial “School X-ing” and “Yield” signs because they are ‘flooring it’ all the time.

          • skeletony

            Agreed. I would add that, in addition to focusing too much on stripping the ball (instead of tackling) I think the speed of our young defense is working against us. I cannot even count how many times I saw Thomas, Chancellor or Wright (etc.) run right by an opposing ball carrier who had ‘stutter-stepped’ or changed direction a bit.
            I was chocking this up to them lacking patience and veteran wile. The way they play is often like a NASCAR driver in a residential neighborhood; can’t see the proverbial “School X-ing” and “Yield” signs because they are ‘flooring it’ all the time.

          • skeletony

            Agreed. I would add that, in addition to focusing too much on stripping the ball (instead of tackling) I think the speed of our young defense is working against us. I cannot even count how many times I saw Thomas, Chancellor or Wright (etc.) run right by an opposing ball carrier who had ‘stutter-stepped’ or changed direction a bit.
            I was chocking this up to them lacking patience and veteran wile. The way they play is often like a NASCAR driver in a residential neighborhood; can’t see the proverbial “School X-ing” and “Yield” signs because they are ‘flooring it’ all the time.

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